“Us” Movie Review

Caelin White

Jenna Johnson, Editor

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The new horror movie “Us”, directed by acclaimed director and producer Jordan Peele, brings a horrifying spin on ones fond childhood memories in a funhouse. Many have high expectations for this movie, as Peele’s directorial debut “Get Out” which was released in 2017, was a box office hit. Much of what makes Peele unique in comparison to the rest of the horror genre, is his ability to sprinkle in social commentary in combination with terrifying visuals to bring awareness to greater issues whilst also making you check under your bed twice before going to sleep.

“Us” follows an ordinary family of four, the Wilsons, who go on a trip to visit the beachfront house, where matriarch Adelaide had grew up in as a child, and had a traumatizing experience in. This nice trip soon turns into an absolute nightmare for the family as they are stalked by dopplegangers of themselves who copy their every moves. Without going into much further detail about the plot, “Us” provided a surreal experience which left me clenching onto the edge of my seat the entire time. Nita George, who had also recently saw the movie she said “It was unlike any other horror movie I have ever seen. There were so many plot twists and I never knew what to expect. I highly recommend this movie”

It was unlike any other horror movie I have ever seen. There were so many plot twists and I never knew what to expect. I highly recommend this movie”

— Nita George

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Many other movies in this genre tend to recycle the same storylines, using cheesy jump scares and overtly bloody and grotesque visuals in hopes of scaring their audience. This overused ploy has fallen out of favor with many audiences who want something unique to freshen their palettes. “Us” provides the experience of a horror movie whilst also giving the audience a chance to come to their own conclusions. The ending of the movie can be interpreted in many ways, and this level of ambiguity is found to be appealing by many.